The Rise of the Self-Publishing Industry and the Decline of Publishing Companies

An interesting article in the New York Times on the rise of the self-publishing industry and the decline of publishing companies in the midst of the financial crisis.

As traditional publishers look to prune their booklists and rely increasingly on blockbuster best sellers, self-publishing companies are ramping up their title counts and making money on books that sell as few as five copies, in part because the author, rather than the publisher, pays for things like cover design and printing costs.

The self-publishing companies generally make their money either by charging author fees — which can range from $99 to $100,000 for a variety of services, including custom cover design and marketing and distribution to online retailers, or by taking a portion of book sales, or both.

Some, like Lulu Enterprises and CreateSpace from Amazon.com, allow the author to create the book free, but then make their money on a small printing markup and a profit split with the author.

For some authors, the appeal of self-publishing is that they can put their books on the market much faster than through traditional publishers.

In 2008, Author Solutions, which is based in Bloomington, Ind., and operates iUniverse as well as other print-on-demand imprints including AuthorHouse and Wordclay, published 13,000 titles, up 12 percent from the previous year.

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1 Comment

Filed under Arts, Media, Photos

One response to “The Rise of the Self-Publishing Industry and the Decline of Publishing Companies

  1. lostsoul2009

    Very useful, thanks.

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